No Solar Glasses to be Offered at Ivy Tech Eclipse Viewing Party

Evansville, IN —  Ivy Tech Community College will not be distributing free solar viewing glasses at its Eclipse viewing party on Aug. 21 as had been reported earlier, due to a recall notice from Amazon today. This is affecting thousands of customers throughout the nation, according to Amazon. On its website, Amazon stated, “Safety is among our highest priorities. Out of an abundance of caution, we have proactively reached out to customers and provided refunds for eclipse glasses that may not comply with industry standards,” the website stated.

Ivy Tech purchased from a NASA-approved company, and the safety glasses had the correct ISO and Shade Level requirements. “However, we have made the decision not to distribute the glasses, but to use alternative safer means to experience the 99% totality at our viewing party,” said Marsha Jackson, executive director of marketing and communication.

At the Ivy Tech viewing party, “It’s a New Day at Ivy Tech,” materials will be provided to make an inexpensive pinhole projector so that individuals can safely – with their back to the sun – view an inverted image of the movement of the moon over the sun on a piece of cardboard. Directions will be provided at the event.

Discussion about the eclipse will be led by Michael Hosack, assistant professor of physics at Ivy Tech. The event takes place on Monday from 11:55 a.m. (CST) to 2:49 p.m. (CST) with maximum coverage at 1:24 p.m. The viewing party will be located on Ivy Tech’s northeast parking lot, at the corner of Colonial Avenue and Tremont Road on the Ivy Tech Campus at 3501 N. First Avenue in Evansville. The event is free and open to the public.

“We are pleased to be able to share our faculty member’s expertise with our students and members of the community, during this unusual Eclipse which is occurring not only here – but across the United States,” said Chancellor Jonathan Weinzapfel. “Our faculty member, Dr. Hosack, is looking forward to sharing his insight in a safe and informative environment, as the moon passes between the earth and the sun.”

Hosack has been with Ivy Tech since 2013. Prior to Ivy Tech, he was a visiting assistant professor of physics at Purdue University, and worked for three years at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, as a scientist working on radiation detectors for satellites. He will lead an informal discussion intermittently as the first hour of the Eclipse is viewed.

According to the website, “Great American Eclipse,” solar eclipses occur because of a cosmic coincidence: “the Sun is just about the same apparent size in our sky as the Moon. While the sun is actually about 400 times larger in diameter that the moon, the moon is also about 400 times closer than the sun. Therefore, the sun and moon appear to be about the same size in our sky.” The coming Eclipse is special because “it will be accessible to so many millions of Americans…There is a 60 to 70 mile wide path of totality,” according to the website. This year’s Eclipse is special because it cuts diagonally across the entire United States. The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918.

Totality will cross from Oregon to Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Evansville is not in that path of totality, but individuals will be able to see an Eclipse that covers 99% of the sun. The next total solar Eclipse that will be in the U.S. will occur on April 8, 2024. The line of totality will cross from Texas, up through the Midwest, almost directly over Indianapolis, Cleveland, Buffalo, NY, and over New England to Maine, then to Canada.

For those with questions, please contact Marsha Jackson, at mjackson353@ivytech.edu

No Solar Glasses to be Offered at Ivy Tech Eclipse Viewing Party

View the Eclipse at Ivy Tech Evansville on Aug. 21

Evansville, IN —  An Eclipse viewing party is planned at Ivy Tech Evansville, on Aug. 21, Solar_3_Roundfrom the beginning of the Eclipse through the end. Led by Michael Hosack, assistant professor of physics at Ivy Tech, Ivy Tech students and the public will have the opportunity to learn about the Eclipse as they are viewing it.

The event, “It’s a New Day at Ivy Tech,” will take place from 11:55 a.m. (CST) to 2:49 p.m. (CST) with maximum coverage at 1:24 p.m., on Monday, Aug. 21. The viewing party will be located on Ivy Tech’s northeast parking lot, at the corner of Colonial Avenue and Tremont Road on the Ivy Tech Campus at 3501 N. First Avenue in Evansville. The event is free and open to the public.

“We are pleased to be able to share our faculty’s expertise with our students and members of the community, during this unusual Eclipse which is occurring not only here – but across the United States,” said Chancellor Jonathan Weinzapfel. “Our faculty member, Dr. Hosack, is looking forward to sharing his insight in a safe and informative environment, as the moon passes between the earth and the sun.”

Hosack has been with Ivy Tech since 2013. Prior to Ivy Tech, he was a visiting assistant professor of physics at Purdue University, and worked for three years at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, as a scientist working on radiation detectors for satellites. He will lead an informal discussion intermittently as the first hour of the Eclipse is viewed.

Souvenir t-shirts will be provided by Ivy Tech while supplies last. Also at the event will be materials to make small pinhole projectors for group or individual viewing of the eclipse.

According to the website, “Great American Eclipse,” solar eclipses occur because of a cosmic coincidence: “the Sun is just about the same apparent size in our sky as the Moon. While the sun is actually about 400 times larger in diameter that the moon, the moon is also about 400 times closer than the sun. Therefore, the sun and moon appear to be about the same size in our sky.” The coming Eclipse is special because “it will be accessible to so many millions of Americans…There is a 60 to 70 mile wide path of totality,” according to the website. This year’s Eclipse is special because it cuts diagonally across the entire United States. The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918.

Totality will cross from Oregon to Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Evansville is not in that path of totality, but individuals will be able to see an Eclipse that covers 99% of the sun. The next total solar Eclipse that will be in the U.S. will occur on April 8, 2024. The line of totality will cross from Texas, up through the Midwest, almost directly over Indianapolis, Cleveland, Buffalo, NY, and over New England to Maine, then to Canada.

For those with questions, please contact Marsha Jackson, at mjackson353@ivytech.edu

View the Eclipse at Ivy Tech Evansville on Aug. 21

Ivy Tech, PCBIDC, Community Foundation Announce Trained and Ready Campaign

PrintA way to provide reliability and consistency in creating a pipeline of individuals who are ready, willing, and able to work in business and industry in the Perry County area, was announced today at Ivy Tech Community College Tell City. The Trained & Ready Capital Campaign is focusing on local employers who would benefit from having an educated workforce in these high-demand fields.

Also announced was the site’s name change to Ivy Tech Tell City Career and Technology Center, to better reflect Ivy Tech’s commitment to developing the workforce of the region, said Ivy Tech Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Kelly Cozart.

“A skilled workforce creates a firm foundation for business and industry, and the Trained & Ready Campaign is designed to assist with this specific educational process in Perry County and surrounding communities,” Cozart said. “By providing opportunities for individuals to gain skills in career fields represented in the region, the economy is strengthened, individuals will have secure, good-paying careers, and there will be less attrition in the workforce.”

The Perry County Business and Industrial Development Corporation, along with the Perry County Community Foundation, have identified workforce development needs and partnered with Ivy Tech Tell City, to raise funds for equipment and scholarships for the in-demand training needed for regional businesses.

“Companies across our region, the State of Indiana, and our entire country are in need of educated and skilled employees to ensure a qualified labor pool that can meet ever-evolving demands,” said Lee Chestnut, President of the Perry County Business & Industrial Development Corporation.  The Trained & Ready Campaign is a partnership with our regional employers to continually identify and review the technical skills needed within that profession.  “This is about truly sharing our resources for the growth of our region as this equipment and space can be shared by our existing companies to train employees as well as area K-12 vocational programs.”

Chestnut said that to date, nearly $305,000 of the $500,000 goal has been pledged, as those funds will be used  in a variety of ways such as purchasing training equipment identified by our regional employers, scholarships for individuals to earn certifications, and to pay for finishing out an existing room to hold Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) classes. “In essence, our overall goal is to fundamentally better utilize our resources in order to grow our region both in labor force as well as in educational attainment.”

Major donors to the campaign include: Waupaca, ATTC and Masterbrand Cabinets.

“Many positions are becoming difficult to fill as we continue to add machines, automate equipment, and require skilled team members to work in our facility,” said Cody Dawson, Assistant Plant Manager at Waupaca Foundry, Perry County’s largest employer. Dawson went on to say, “At this point, workforce training is not optional; it is essential for the future success of our company as well as our entire community.”

The Perry County Community Foundation is offering a 50% match to any cash donations made to it by August 31, and designated for the Trained and Ready Campaign, Chestnut said.

Anyone who would like to learn more about the program or to make a pledge should contact Lee Chestnut at (812) 547-8377 or by email – lee@pickperry.com.

Ivy Tech, PCBIDC, Community Foundation Announce Trained and Ready Campaign

Ivy Tech Community College Alumnus Designs Bus Shelter

busshelterribboncutting

Evansville, Ind.- A new Ivy Tech bus shelter and its designer, Ivy Tech alumnus Darren Wharton, was recognized at Ivy Tech Community College today (7-26-17). The shelter is located on the west side of campus off of First Avenue. It offers benches and shelter from the elements for those waiting at the METS bus stop on Ivy Tech’s Evansville campus.

“This is a shining example of the skills and knowledge that Ivy Tech students gain while working toward their degree,” said Chancellor Jonathan Weinzapfel. “Darren’s design is not only attractive, but also very functional both day and night, rain or shine. We are proud to have this shelter and are happy to offer it to our bus riders.”

The project began in 2011 when the need for a covered shelter was recognized. Wharton, a student studying Design Technology at the time, discussed the needs with student leaders and began preliminary design sketches and renderings. With the guidance of design technology faculty member Mike Satterfield, Wharton decided on construction materials, drawings and building code requirements. He then presented the concepts to the chancellor at that time, Dan Schenk.

Wharton’s concept came to fruition and was fabricated in 2017 by a company in Lake Forest, Illinois. Installation was completed by Danco Construction of Evansville in May of this year.

Wharton, currently a draftsman for Pittsburg Tank & Tower Group in Henderson, Ky., is a 2012 graduate of Ivy Tech Community College Evansville. He completed his associate of applied science degree in Design Technology with a concentration in Architecture and was an honor graduate. During his time at the College, he was president of the Design Technology local chapter of The American Institute of Architecture Students.

Ivy Tech Community College Alumnus Designs Bus Shelter

Express Enrollment Day June 24 at Ivy Tech Evansville

express-enrollment-dayEvansville, IN- Ivy Tech Community College Evansville will host Express Enrollment Day, on Saturday, June 24, for individuals interested in enrolling in classes for fall 2017. The free event is designed to assist interested individuals in completing the enrollment process, potentially, all in one day!

The event is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ivy Tech’s Evansville campus, 3501 N. 1st Avenue, in Evansville.

At the event students will have the opportunity to:

  • Complete the FAFSA or have their financial aid questions answered.  Also, students can learn more about aid such as grants, scholarships and loans.
  • Create their MyIvy account, complete their FYIvy and schedule a face-to-face orientation session.
  • Determine what assessments may be needed to enroll.
  • Meet with an academic advisor.
  • Register for classes.

Here is what students should bring to Express Enrollment:

  • Government issued ID
  • Tax information (if filing a FAFSA-Ivy Tech code 009917)
  • High School and/or College Transcripts – whichever applies
  • An idea of what he/she would like to study

For more information and to RSVP, visit ivytech.edu/EEStatewide.

Express Enrollment Day June 24 at Ivy Tech Evansville

Ivy Tech Community College Announces Jonathan Weinzapfel as Chancellor of Evansville Campus as Part of Restructure Project

WeinzapfelEvansville, IN — Ivy Tech Community College has named Jonathan Weinzapfel to serve as Chancellor of its Evansville campus as a part of its organizational restructure announcement.  The new structure, to better align with community needs at the campus level and empower campuses to be responsive and nimble in meeting local needs, was announced on Tuesday.

Prior to the change, multiple campuses reported to regional leadership,  including the college’s Evansville and Terre Haute campuses reporting to a single chancellor, a role Weinzapfel held.  Evansville will now be self-sustaining campus with Weinzapfel serving as the Chancellor. In Terre Haute, Lea Anne Crooks will continue as the Campus President. Further announcements regarding additional Chancellor appointments will continue through Aug. 1.

“We appreciate Jonathan’s dedication to Ivy Tech and to the difficult work of leading not only the Evansville campus, but also the Terre Haute campus since May 2014. His leadership of the combined regions developed several successful programs and best practices that have been replicated across the state,” Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann said.  “This new structure, with Jonathan at the helm of the Evansville campus, will allow Ivy Tech to more intentionally focus on community needs of Evansville and southwest Indiana.”

“I look forward to continuing to lead the Evansville campus as we serve the Evansville community and Southwest Indiana. The faculty and staff at Ivy Tech’s Evansville campus are extraordinary and provide our students with the skills and knowledge they need to learn, live and work in our communities and beyond.”

While serving in his role Ivy Tech, Weinzapfel developed and promoted the popular Achieve Your Degree™ program, aligning business and industry tuition reimbursement dollars with Federal Financial Aid, and deferring tuition payments until employees receive their company tuition funding – at the completion of the semester. This program is now been offered throughout the state via nearly 70 employers and more than 2,600 students have enrolled.

His leadership, vision, and direction also led to the Evansville campus receiving a $667,000 grant from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, to offer free classes to individuals wanting the skills necessary to work in manufacturing; and paying the students during their class and on-the-job training.  Among successes at the Terre Haute campus, was a $1.2 million grant from the Economic Development Administration for the college’s Precision Agriculture Technology program.

He came to Ivy Tech from Faegre Baker Daniels where he focused his legal practice on economic development issues and municipal consulting. Previously, Weinzapfel served two terms as Mayor of the City of Evansville and five years as a state representative.

Weinzapfel serves on several boards including the Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation, Vigo County School Corporation Superintendent’s Advisory Board, Accelerate West Central Indiana Economic Development, Rural Health Innovation Collaborative Board of Directors, the Indiana Humanities Board of Trustees, Deaconess Board of Directors, NeuMed Board of Directors, WNIN Board of Directors, Economic Development Coalition of Southwest Board of Directors, Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science Board of Trustees, Koch Family Children’s Museum of Evansville Wisdom Council, United Way of Southwest Indiana, and most recently was named to the Board of Directors of the Indiana United Way.

He is also a member of Rotary of Evansville, Southwest Indiana Chamber of Commerce and Jasper Chamber of Commerce.

In 2012, Weinzapfel earned an honorary degree of Associate of Science in College and Community Service from Ivy Tech. He has also earned a J.D. from the Indiana University School of Law, a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University and a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry from Indiana University.

Ivy Tech Community College Announces Jonathan Weinzapfel as Chancellor of Evansville Campus as Part of Restructure Project

Ivy Tech, Habitat for Humanity Form Partnership To Assist Habitat Families with College Degree

Habitat for Humanity and Ivy Tech Community College today (6-15-17) announced a partnership to offer career counseling and scholarship funding to assist Habitat homeowners and their families to attain a college degree.

IvySucceed will help individuals to understand where their strengths lie, to set goals, and to determine next steps to earn a degree. For those who have already earned a degree or certificate, Ivy Tech will provide assistance with interview skills and resume development. Habitat and Ivy Tech have also partnered to provide $10,000 in scholarship funds in this pilot program to assist a minimum of five individuals through completion of their college degree.

The announcement was made as a part of Habitat’s annual Faith in Action Breakfast, where Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann, was the guest speaker.

In addition, Ivy Tech’s Visual Communication program will build an App for Habitat, for homeowners to have an easy way to track their “sweat equity” hours that each individual must fulfill. Ivy Tech will also provide one college credit to all who have completed the Habitat Homeowners Money Management Seminar Habitat offers.

“We are pleased to partner with Habitat and help homeowners and their children through the IvySucceed initiative,” said Jonathan Weinzapfel, chancellor of Ivy Tech in Evansville. “Housing brings family stability, and education brings family self-sufficiency. Helping individuals succeed by determining their skill sets and career goals – and matching that with the use of federal financial aid and scholarships – will help those who desire to go to college, to realize their goals.”

“Habitat for Humanity helps families achieve strength, stability and self-reliance through homeownership.  Combined with the strong educational foundation that Ivy Tech provides, a family can reach that next level in life – however they define it,” said Beth Ann Folz, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Evansville.  “IvySucceed is an exciting initiative which brings together the synergy of a stable home with the opportunity of education for a good-paying, in-demand job in the community.”

Individuals interested in this opportunity should go to www.ivytech.edu/habitat to fill out an interest form to receive more information.

Ivy Tech, Habitat for Humanity Form Partnership To Assist Habitat Families with College Degree